Beyond The Wand

Showing posts tagged lgbtq

Please reblog this, it is very important.

edman93:

If you don’t remember Sophie M Herold, she is a German girl, who is extremely homophobic and transphobic. She has found out LGBTQ persons names, addresses, personal info etc. And set up her own database.

Her intentions with this are harmful.

She is sending out this information, your information, your best friends information, someone you love and care about. She’s sending it to hate groups, malicious people, people with bad intentions.

And if you think I’m blowing this out of proportion, people have been kicked out of homes, disowned by families and even MURDERED. Yes, murdered. Innocent people who have done nothing but love.

She has had numerous blogs and each have been removed. Tumblr staff are aware of her, and as far as I’m aware she currently doesn’t have a blog, but this does not mean she isn’t still on peoples tumblrs, asking via anon where you live, what your name is.

An email I received today. She’s sending out information of same sex couples with children so the children can be kidnapped. She entitled it “Time to strike back”. If that doesn’t suggest harmful intentions I don’t know what does.

Please be extremely careful what you post on tumblr, on twitter, facebook, anywhere. Do NOT give out your full name or your address, or even the town in which you live. Look out for one another, and don’t answer any suspicious anons. Especially if they use your name in quotation marks.


Sophie M Herold is still out there, she always will be, so please spead this message and warn people. She’s attacking in silence. We don’t need more people dying because of her actions.

Thank you.

WHAT.

I DON’T EVEN.

(Post reblogged from thiscrookedcrown)

GENDER BALANCE IN MODERN PAGANISM

littlecitywitch:

This is a short presentation I (littlecitywitch) prepared for the 2012 Canadian National Pagan Conference (aka Gaia Gathering), which happened over the last 4 days at the University of Toronto. The prompt I was given is as follows:

How much of an issue is gender balance in our Canadian Pagan scene? Where is the pendulum swinging these days? Are we really a female dominated community? Are the opportunities equal for men and women? Are the Gods and Goddesses worshipped equally? Do they need to be?”

And here is my response to that. Trans folks, genderqueer folks, everyone whose gender defies the restrictive norms of our society - please let me know if I have fucked up anywhere in this writing. I am doin’ my best and am always learning. 

—- 

Hi everyone! I’m going to start by introducing myself – my name is Aradia Rosa James, and I’ve been a witch and pagan for fourteen years. I identify as a queer cisgendered woman. To briefly brush up on these terms, for those of you that aren’t familiar with them, ‘queer’ refers to sexual minorities which are not heterosexual, heteronormative, or gender-binary. ‘Cis’ is a prefix that means my gender identity conforms with my sex – I was female assigned at birth, and I continue to identify in that way. 

I’ve given a lot of thought lately to the concept of balance, and particularly the notion of ‘gender balance. It seems that in the larger pagan community the phrase is usually used to indicate equal portions of male and female. Popular conceptions of male and female qualities tag along, and we end up with derivative dichotomies between passive and active, dark and light, etc, even though these qualities are not inherently gendered. Ancient and modern paganisms draw upon a pool of archetypes that are both beautiful and useful in our religious and magical lives – that of the moon goddess and the sun god, the assertive male warrior figure and the silent and wise female, in touch with deep unconscious knowledge. These archetypes and symbols are not inherently incorrect – indeed, I believe they have their place, as a few key ingredients in a large and diverse melting pot – but I posit that they derive from a false binary which drives and dominates much of the conversation on gender in contemporary paganism.

The binary of male/female is held up by essentialist notions of what male and female are, at an essential, basic, level. In relation to the topic at hand, essentialist modes of thinking assert that ‘maleness’ and ‘femaleness’ can be pinned down to a list of exact, ‘essential’ characteristics. Taking this idea a bit further, it asserts that all male-gendered people experience maleness in the same way, and the same grandiose sweeping statement is made for females. When it comes to gender, essentialist ideas can be quickly called into question by the experience of people whose genders do not, or have not always fit into a neat split between one or the other. For instance, my experience of my femaleness is very different from someone who is trans* or genderfluid, and it differs even from that of other cisgendered females. 

By arguing against essentialism and stating that ‘man’ and ‘woman’ do not exist in a concrete form, we can break apart the construct of the binary. None of us are only ‘man’ or ‘woman,’ just as ‘natural’ cannot truly be separated from ‘artificial’; we are both and everything in between; we are all composites, a mish-mash of various influences and characteristics, hybrids – or, as Donna Haraway would say, cyborgs. The cyborg moves away from oppositional modes of thinking, acknowledges diversity, and paves the way for acceptance of many modes of being. The cyborg has the capacity to see balance everywhere, and to see gender balance in a way that is not hinged upon acceptance of a male/female dichotomy as being the ultimate expression of balance through gender.

Where do we draw the lines between male and female? Why? I bet the more people you ask, the more answers you will get. The male/female binary in much of paganism seems to be informed by the logic of biological determinism, or the idea that our biological sex determines our overall disposition and inclinations. An extension of this idea would be that all people who are assigned female at birth are in touch with their emotions and their spirituality, and have access to a deeper spiritual subconscious. We can see this idea reflected in a lot of modern pagan symbolism, as tropes born of biological determinism persist in our spiritual and magical practices. This kind of thought has the potential to alienate many pagans, regardless of gender or sexuality. It is also, of course, deeply limiting.

One problem with the male/female binary which overwhelms gender representations in modern paganism is that it is, by and large, the only representation of ‘gender balance,’ or indeed, often ‘balance’ at all.  It’s important that we move away from seeing male and female as two extremes, two different points on a scale, and believe that only when they are equal is ‘balance’ achieved. As compassionate pagans in today’s world, it’s vital that we come together and question the ethos from which this assumption was born. It is a heteronormative and undoubtedly cisgendered worldview. 

Why is conversation about gender in today’s paganism dominated by notions of male/female dichotomies? Why does male plus female have to equal balance? Why do we place so much emphasis on balance between perceived opposites? Though these notions are certainly endemic in all aspects of contemporary Western society, in the pagan community these ideas have perhaps trickled down from British Traditional Wicca, with its emphasis on a male/female binary. This form of Wicca is valid in its own right, though it’s certainly not where everyone feels at home – and its emphasis on gender as binary plays a large role in that. It is one expression of many, yet it continues to dominate notions of gender balance in most forms of modern paganism, and in the larger pagan community as a whole, especially in North America. Alternative narratives concerning gender and more inclusive notions of gender balance are emerging in discussions in small groups of political radicals, activists, and anarchists. This is a fantastic development, but when will these discussions reach a larger community of pagans, and when will we as a larger community begin to step outside the notion of the male/female gender binary as normative, and all other notions of gender as deviant, weird, or unusual? 

As a community, we should not only be concerned with equal opportunities for men and women. We should work to become more aware of and inclusive of the experience of gender non-conforming people, such as individuals who may identify as trans, genderfluid, genderqueer, or anything else. We as a community need to reframe the question of what gender balance means and how it is expressed. We can begin to do this by broadening our conceptions of gender and balance. By actively engaging in that discussion, we can begin to pave the way to allow gender non-conforming pagans to feel secure and safe in pagan spaces, and create avenues for their voices to be heard. 

I’ve been having thoughts like this in my head, but I hadn’t yet managed to get them written out.  I think this piece hits all of the important points on the issue.

(Post reblogged from littlecitywitch)

First post.

inshekina:

shadowsighsilverlights:

thetranstruth:

Let me just say that this blog is not a hate blog against homosexuals, bisexuals, whatever. What someone prefers sexually is completely irrelevant. We fully support the LGB community. This is a 2 person blog, one straight person, one bisexual. 

This blog will address several issues (not all inclusive):

-the legitimacy of the transsexual status

-Gender Identity Disorder (how a sex change is NOT a valid treatment for a mental disorder)

-violent threats from the trans community

-why we support the gender binary

-how the gender spectrum idea is OFFENSIVE to us and limiting to both genders rather than freeing

-discrimination (on BOTH sides)

-the biology and science of sex and human development

We don’t hate transgendered people. We don’t want any of them to die or be maimed (even though many of them would want us to die for not agreeing with them). We just think that there are better treatments for Gender Identity Disorder.  We also think that many members of this community say things that are hurtful, divisive, violent, and not scientifically sound. Yet no one can say anything to counter these statements for fear of being called a bigot.

We hope that this blog will open up a dialogue about these issues.

What the actual fuck is wrong with you (you plural if there really are two of you ignorant fucks running that blog, and I don’t believe it for a second).

If you’re not trans* then you don’t have any right to speculate on “the legitimacy of the transsexual status”. You just need to stop right fucking there. It’s not your fucking business; it’s not up to you to pass judgment on the legitimacy of anyone’s identity. It’s not your business. It’s as much your business as it is my business, which is not at all, because we’re not trans*.

Talking about “scientifically sound”! The fuck is wrong with you! Unless you have been properly trained and educated in the area, who the fuck are you to determine what is or isn’t a proper “treatment” for anything! If you’re going to go around spouting off bullshit about what you think is a “disorder” and how it should be “treated” then you fuckers better be able to show some credentials. Unless you’re somebody’s fucking doctor or the person in question yourself, then you really have absolutely no right at all to be making statements about anyone’s health. 

Clearly somebody managed to hurt your fucking cisprivileged feelings. Boo-motherfucking-hoo. That does not give you the fucking right to launch some all out attack and slander campaign against an entire community of people you obviously know nothing about. You really need to stop this fucking bullshit now, and you shouldn’t have started it to begin with. 

Reblogging for shadowsighsilverlights’s commentary. 

Translation of the original post: “LOL WE NON-TRANS PEOPLE HAVE OPINIONS ABOUT YOU TRANS PEOPLE AND WE EXPECT YOU TO RESPECT US EVEN THOUGH WE DON’T KNOW WHAT WE’RE EVEN TALKING ABOUT CUZ WE JUST HATE HOW WE GET IGNORED FOR EXPECTING TRANS PEOPLE TO TAKE OUR SPECULATIONS MORE SERIOUSLY THAN THEIR LIVED EXPERIENCES”

Hey, let’s take this a step further and replace trans stuff with gay stuff:

This blog will address several issues (not all inclusive):

-the legitimacy of the homosexual lifestyle

-Homosexual Attraction Disorder (how same-sex relationships are NOT valid relationships)

-violent threats from the gay community

-why we support traditional marriage

-how the ideas of bisexuality and pansexuality are OFFENSIVE to us and limiting to gays and straights rather than freeing

-discrimination (on BOTH sides)

-the biology and science of sex and human development

We don’t hate gay people. We don’t want any of them to die or be maimed (even though many of them would want us to die for not agreeing with them). We just think homosexuals should be cured.  We also think that many members of this community say things that are hurtful, divisive, violent, and not scientifically sound. Yet no one can say anything to counter these statements for fear of being called a bigot.

We hope that this blog will open up a dialogue about these issues.

Gee, and they wonder why they’re being called bigoted?

(Post reblogged from cosmicwitchery)

Is International Pagan Coming Out Day appropriative?

allyintraining:

I’m curious what people think of this, particularly people in the LGBT* community.

I like the idea of the day, and the whole concept of “coming out of the broom closet” as we say. But I worry that it is misappropriating the LGBT* terminology.

“Coming out” is definitely a relevant concept for Pagans. We do experience discrimination for our religion, and when people find out we’re Pagans they have a wide variety of reactions, from telling us we’re going to Hell, to asking us if we worship the devil or make animal sacrifices. We experience discrimation in the workplace, etc. etc. So I think having this day is important. It’s one of the ways we can make Paganism more mainstream, more socially acceptable.

So what say you? Appropriative? And if so, is there a better term we could be using instead?

As an LGBT* person, I don’t mind at all if pagans and LGBT* use the term, at least as long as they’re not some kind of homophobe/transphobe.  LGBT* folks and pagan folks tend to get shat upon by the same people, so… yeah.

As long as you’re not someone who hates on LGBT* folks, it’s all good as far as I’m concerned.

(Post reblogged from allyintraining)

page-of-pentacles:

i love reading about other people’s experiences with spirituality, worship, and witchcraft, but for me witchcraft isn’t religious; i don’t worship any deities, and my own belief system is complicated. so because of that, i’m especially interested in hearing from non-religious witches/non-worshipping witches.

of course, religion and worship mean different things to different people—so for clarification, i really want to meet people who don’t necessarily love and serve godcreatures, or at least do so in a way that is unrelated to their witchcraft. 

(and i am positively thirsting to meet nonbinary identified witches, or any other witches under the trans* umbrella.)

i’m especially interested in hedge witches, brujas (particularly euro-spanish brujas), and witches who practice any methods of divination, but pretty much anyone is welcome. 

I tend to be pretty non-religious as far as witches go.  I identify as an atheogenecist - I believe that beings known to humanity as gods exist, but that they didn’t create the universe.

I’m also genderfluid, though I can’t lay any claim to Spanishicity.  :P

(Post reblogged from page-of-pentacles)
My biggest beef with Wicca in a nutshell.  People harp on about how  it’s such a welcoming religion for sexual minorities when the religion  is extremely cis/heteronormative.  The triple goddess is defined as “the  maid, mother, and crone,” yet the triple god is defined as “the youth,  warrior, and sage.”  See a difference?  Women = mothers and nurturers,  men = fighters (and rather conspicuously not fathers).  As someone put it (I forget who now), the female is defined by what her body does, whereas the man is defined by what he chooses to do.   What about women who don’t want to or can’t have children?  What about  men who’d rather stay at home with the kids or paint or do anything that doesn’t involve fighting?  (I suppose you could argue that it’s a “metaphorical” fight - but then why aren’t women warriors, too?)
My second-biggest beef would be the way people try to defend it  by derailing the topic, usually by comparing it to the  cis/heteronormativity and sexism in Christianity.  Apparently, it’s a-OK  for a religion to be sexist, cis/heteronormative, and  gender-essentialist so long as it’s not as bad as Christianity.  Sorry people, good by comparison is not the same as good enough.
(Click here to put your own captions on this image!)

My biggest beef with Wicca in a nutshell.  People harp on about how it’s such a welcoming religion for sexual minorities when the religion is extremely cis/heteronormative.  The triple goddess is defined as “the maid, mother, and crone,” yet the triple god is defined as “the youth, warrior, and sage.”  See a difference?  Women = mothers and nurturers, men = fighters (and rather conspicuously not fathers).  As someone put it (I forget who now), the female is defined by what her body does, whereas the man is defined by what he chooses to do.  What about women who don’t want to or can’t have children?  What about men who’d rather stay at home with the kids or paint or do anything that doesn’t involve fighting?  (I suppose you could argue that it’s a “metaphorical” fight - but then why aren’t women warriors, too?)

My second-biggest beef would be the way people try to defend it by derailing the topic, usually by comparing it to the cis/heteronormativity and sexism in Christianity.  Apparently, it’s a-OK for a religion to be sexist, cis/heteronormative, and gender-essentialist so long as it’s not as bad as Christianity.  Sorry people, good by comparison is not the same as good enough.

(Click here to put your own captions on this image!)

I apologize to anyone whose gender and/or sexuality isn’t included on this.  I realize that this is oversimplified and imperfect like whoa nelly, but it’s basically a quick thought experiment/mindhack I hammered out as a response to Wicca’s inherent cis/heteronormativity.  Are there eight deities, or is there but one individual whose sex and gender morphs throughout the year?  You decide.
Edit: A lot of people seem to be complaining about this image.  As I’ve already said, it’s imperfect.  It’s not supposed to be an end to any sort of problem in and of itself; it’s just a reality hack/culture jam intended to start breaking down the walls between compartmentalized beliefs, and hopefully, to inspire something better.

I apologize to anyone whose gender and/or sexuality isn’t included on this.  I realize that this is oversimplified and imperfect like whoa nelly, but it’s basically a quick thought experiment/mindhack I hammered out as a response to Wicca’s inherent cis/heteronormativity.  Are there eight deities, or is there but one individual whose sex and gender morphs throughout the year?  You decide.

Edit: A lot of people seem to be complaining about this image.  As I’ve already said, it’s imperfect.  It’s not supposed to be an end to any sort of problem in and of itself; it’s just a reality hack/culture jam intended to start breaking down the walls between compartmentalized beliefs, and hopefully, to inspire something better.

(Link reblogged from lindentea)