Beyond The Wand

Showing posts tagged christianity

deconversionmovement:

whycatholicism:

Next time you hear someone claim Christianity is just a mish-mash of old pagan religions, or anyone says anything positive about the movie Zeitgeist ever, remember this chart. 

This is a blatant misrepresentation of mythicism.  Zeitgeist has some things right, but it has so many things wrong that it’s hard to take anything from it. However, that doesn’t mean that mythicism doesn’t have any merits.  We’ve discussed this.  In any case, informed atheists don’t put any stock in Zeitgeist.  Want to know some mythicism, consult Carrier, Price, Thompson, Brodie, Doherty, etc.  I have some sources for anyone who’s interested.

Christianity does indeed carry over many tropes and conventions of its neighboring religions, but the similarities are less in-your-face than Zeitgeist would have you think.  Pagan Origins of the Christ Myth is an excellent website that puts what Christianity does and doesn’t have in common with its neighbors into perspective.

(Source: )

(Photo reblogged from academicatheism)

From the fundies: When you do X, you’re “unknowingly” worshiping pagan gods/Satan

From a recent post that appeared on FSTDT:

I do not want to stereotype but most athiests i have met were gays. Yet they fail to notice that when they engage in sexual activity that goes against procreation they take part in a ritual that worships baal peor.

Yes, it’s ridiculous to equate sex with worship of specific Canaanite deity.  That’s not the point.  The point is, there’s a lot of this “unknowing worship” buzz going around in certain fundie circles.

One example that immediately comes to mind is the claim that most people who celebrate Halloween are worshiping Satan without even realizing it.  Word is, somehow or another, people are supposed to move on from ignorant Satan worship to deliberate Satan worship.  Of course, how/when this transition is supposed to take place is never really made clear.

Another claim is that environmentalism is secretly Gaia worship, and that most of those who engage in it are unwittingly taking part in pagan religion. And again, at some point they’re supposed to become aware of it and just embrace it.  Why/how is never really explained.

So, what are your thoughts on the claim that accidental/unwitting worship is possible?

I love how Jack Chick’s God/Jesus is such an unabashed dick.

I love how Jack Chick’s God/Jesus is such an unabashed dick.

(Photo reblogged from ohnojackchick)

Really, VenomFangX should probably be the poster boy for this, but his face isn’t on a meme as far as I know.

Apparently, The Avengers is a great film for learning about spiritual warfare.

Article about this guy and his wacky shenanigans

christinsanity:

Toxicity of religion

Yup, that’s about what it’s like.

(Photo reblogged from christinsanity)

#640

thisiswhiteprivilege:

White privilege is having people think you have a legitimate reason to practice Christianity rather than it just being something that was passed onto you from your “white massas.”

Even Jesus said that his thing was not for non-Jews.  Then Paul of Tarsus, a privileged Roman citizen, came along and appropriated it and brought it to the rest of the world.

That’s right guys, appropriation brought us Christianity.

(Post reblogged from thisiswhiteprivilege)

In which I reminisce over what lead me here.

Years ago, I absolutely adored the Paranormal section of About.com.  I eagerly awaited the monthly update of (supposedly true) paranormal stories sent in by readers and read them up as fast as they came.

But there was just one problem: these stories were making me question my Christian religious beliefs.  They described things that should have been impossible based on what I’d been taught.  Now, while were stories that were so absurd I that I was pretty sure the person was making it up, it was difficult for me to dismiss each and every one of them.

So I quit going to the site.

After a long while, I had a thought: Wait a minute.  If I have to keep my ears and eyes closed to all this stuff that’s out there just to maintain my beliefs, there’s something very wrong.

I could only come to the inescapable conclusion that whatever the truth was, it wasn’t what I’d been told.  And I wanted to know just how deep the rabbit-hole went.

There were a couple of times when I was temporarily ‘reconverted.’  But the thing was, I couldn’t keep lying to myself because it went against every fiber of my being.

Years ago, I absolutely adored the Paranormal section of About.com.  I eagerly awaited the monthly update of (supposedly true) paranormal stories sent in by readers and read them up as fast as they came.

But there was just one problem: these stories were making me question my Christian religious beliefs.  They described things that should have been impossible based on what I’d been taught.  Now, while were stories that were so absurd I that I was pretty sure the person was making it up, it was difficult for me to dismiss each and every one of them.

So I quit going to the site.

After a long while, I had a thought: Wait a minute.  If I have to keep my ears and eyes closed to all this stuff that’s out there just to maintain my beliefs, there’s something very wrong.

I could only come to the inescapable conclusion that whatever the truth was, it wasn’t what I’d been told.  And I wanted to know just how deep the rabbit-hole went.

There were a couple of times when I was temporarily ‘reconverted.’  But the thing was, I couldn’t keep lying to myself because it went against every fiber of my being.  I’d seen the man behind the curtain, and there was no denying it.

I am continually searching for answers, and I doubt very much whether I’ll ever have them.  But it’s a great relief to be in a place where I can search instead of being told that I should stop thinking so hard because it will all make sense in some far off Someday.

inbonobo:

The evolution of Archaeopteryx will be excluded from some South Korean high-school textbooks after a creationist campaign. (via nat)
HOLY SOUTH KOREAN CRAP!!!

-weeps for humanity-

inbonobo:

The evolution of Archaeopteryx will be excluded from some South Korean high-school textbooks after a creationist campaign. (via nat)

HOLY SOUTH KOREAN CRAP!!!

-weeps for humanity-

(Photo reblogged from inbonobo)

deconversionmovement:

The God Who Wasn’t There

A must watch!

Sorry, but I’ll recommend that anyone interested in an honest examination of the origins of Christianity pass on this one.

About 20 minutes into the documentary, it brings up the hoary old claim that Jesus was preceded by a glut of virtually-identical savior gods.  It ain’t so.  Jesus has much in common with many gods and savior-archetypes that came before and probably after him (suggesting that he was the product of a larger paradigm), but he wasn’t a perfect play-by-play copy of anyone.

Just as an example of how wrong this documentary is, it lists Baldur as one of the dying-and-rising gods that fit this perfect little mold.  First, it’s questionable whether the story of Baldur’s death and resurrection as we know it even existed before Scandinavia was Christianized.  Secondly, Baldur doesn’t resurrect as such until after the death and rebirth of the world.  Thirdly, he has NOTHING ELSE IN COMMON.  He was NOT born of a virgin, let alone on December 25th.  He did NOT have twelve followers.  He was NOT visited by magi.  A star did NOT herald his birth.  He did NOT turn water into wine, or ANYTHING ELSE on the list.

This whole piece is shoddy reactionary propaganda with little to no regard for intellectual honesty.  There IS evidence that Christianity was very much a product of its time and place (a combination of Jewish apocalypticism and messianism with Hellenic mysticism and possibly Buddhist asceticism), but this film doesn’t contain it.

If anyone is interested in an honest approach, I highly recommend Pagan Origins of the Christ MythTruthSurge also has some excellent videos, and presents a rather good case that Mark’s gospel was inspired by the Odyssey in Excavating The Empty Tomb, parts 5-9.

This documentary comes off more as a wankfest for non-Christians than a genuine attempt to convince anyone of anything.  It contains no arguments that would be even remotely convincing to most Christians - it does not, for example, address the belief that the Old Testament does not apply to Christians (hence absolving them from stoning their children).  It largely relies on appeals to consequences, most of which your average Christian won’t care about because they think they don’t apply to them.

(Video reblogged from academicatheism)